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Best Practices

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22 10, 2020

Building a Proof of Concept in the IBM Cloud in virtually no time

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This blog series demonstrates how easy it is to quickly build a small app based on a new or existing service and to run it as a service in the cloud.

We will build the proof-of-concept for a web app that enables people to better understand how written communication is perceived by their end-users and how to improve the tone of communication.

We’ve explored the options and we’ve selected the IBM Tone Analyzer service. Why this service? It leverages cognitive linguistic analysis to identify the tone of input content enabling users to refine and improve communications.

The diagram below describes the flow

19 10, 2020

How to build a secure proof-of-concept cloud web application

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In previous posts, we developed an application which uses IBM Tone Analyzer to analyze given text and return tone scoring per sentence, then we improved it into an app which evaluates the content of a web page.

In this post we will focus on security and logging. They are often considered irrelevant when it comes to proof-of-concept building to return like a boomerang when building a production-ready application. The framework we used for developing the web app provides some general security options that can easily be implemented. Addressing them from the beginning will help us prevent later security issues.

Always make

02 10, 2020

How to Improve the Look and Feel of a Cloud Foundry Application

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In previous posts, we developed a small web application that runs in the cloud then we transformed it into an application that analyses given text and returns tone scoring per sentence. As we’ve been focusing on the functionality, the extended application was returning a rude output.

With most people judging a web app based on its look and feel, we’ll turn our bare application into something more presentable.

For this, we will use bootstrap as a CSS base and Perl HTML::Template to improve the overall readability of the code.

1. Build the Page Library

We’ll start by building a small library that

29 09, 2020

How to Extend a Basic Cloud Foundry Application

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In this article, we will extend the simple “Hello World” routine that we created last week to a more formal use. The cloud comes with many features, so we picked one that is called “Tone Analyzer”.

The Tone Analyzer service leverages cognitive linguistic analysis to identify the tone of input content enabling users to refine and improve communications.

We will use this cloud service to transform our basic “Hello World” application into an application that analyzes given text and returns tone scoring per sentence.

Let’s find out how to extend our basic application to use the Tone Analyzer.

Getting the IBM Cloud

21 09, 2020

How to Build a Basic Cloud Foundry Application

By |Categories: Best Practices, Cloud Migration, How to|Tags: , |

In this blog series we will develop a small web application that runs in the IBM Cloud. We will be using an old fashion way called rapid application development and an old framework called Plack, a Perl-based web service.

The purpose is twofold.  It demonstrates that traditional style environments can be used to build cloud applications and it also allows us to build a proof of concept in virtually no time.

Let’s get our hands dirty…

Hello world

So here is your basic application that does the usual.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use Plack::Builder;
use Plack::Response;
use strict;

sub main {
my $env

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